Macerator vs Pulverizer: Differences And How They Stack Up


Macerator vs Pulverizer

Macerators and Pulverizers tend to be confused or somewhat used interchangeably, but they are actually two different pieces of machinery.

There are a number of differences between macerators and pulverizers, although many industry experts do recognize that there is some overlap in the services both machines can provide.

As a general guide, macerators are better than pulverizers in small to medium-sized user scenarios like waterwaste management while pulverizers are better than macerators in medium to high capacity where larger solid waste is ground into powder or pulp.

Are you trying to decide between a Macerator and a pulverizer? Then you will like these once in a life time offers over here atĀ Amazon.com website. They currently haveĀ the best Macerator and Pulverizer prices you’ll find anywhere right now.

Macerators for your RV kitchen sink, your toilet waste system, and more can all be found here on Amazon.com for a bargain( alot less much less money), without sacrificing quality. Don’t waste any more time before purchasing a Macerator or Pulverizer from Amazon.com.

RV and marine boating toilets with macerators are excellent examples of where one would not want to use a pulverizer.

Industrial Pulverizers do an excellent job of reducing the particle sizes of food, plastics, and other materials into very small pieces or powder depending upon what application is required.

The large particles that enter the machine are first reduced by impact energy, then ground to smaller particles by intense cutting knives which are mounted on a rotor.

These knives are very sharp rotating at high speeds with the material being pulverized by coming into contact with these blades.

This grinding action is effective for many materials, but certain items like paper or bulky items do not grind so easily in this type of machine.

Macerators can reduce most wastes to either a slurry for pumping away, or into a fine particles that will then be flushed away in the sewer.

Macerator systems are used in water waste treatment to grind all of the solids down to a small enough size so it can be handled by septic pumps and sewer lines.

To prevent clogging from larger materials, they are fed into the machine at a slow enough speed to reduce their impact energy before being crushed.

The fine particles of pulp created during this process are pumped away through special pumping units, but can also be flushed down your drain if it is small enough.

The main difference is that macerators use slicing blades instead of grinding knives to reduce products into smaller pieces.

Macerators are installed below the trapway in a toilet to break down human waste into fine particles that can easily pass through plumbing drains and that can be handled by a septic system.

Pulverizers that are used in industrial and manufacturing settings most often work with harder, more solid materials like plastics and metals, but also work on some food items like nuts and starches.

Macerator vs Pulverizer: How They Work

Macerators and pulverizers use a combination of high speed and high pressure to create a fine, powder like substance from larger pieces of material.

Macerators: How they work.

Macerators pulverize by using rotating macerator blades, which tear apart the material through sheer force and speed. The result is a slurry that can pass through small openings in plumbing lines, making it appropriate for use in homes and businesses.

Macerating uses an up and down action like this to grind the material into a fine pulp. This pulp can then be forced through small openings, allowing it to work in residential and commercial plumbing lines, making macerators particularly useful for clearing sinks, toilets, etc.

Pulverizers: How they work.

Pulverizing uses a crushing action to tear apart the material, which is then ground up by high speed impellers. The result is a fine powder that resembles flour or sand in texture and can be used an alternative to standard products like coal, diatomaceous earth, clay, etc. Pulverizers tend to be able to process most materials, including animal parts, rubber, textiles and plastics.

Macerators vs Pulverizers: How They’re Used

While macerators and pulverizers can be used on a variety of materials, they tend to have very different applications.

Macerators are generally used in places where drainage is an issue, such as sinks, toilets and sewers. The slurry that macerators create is able to clear these spaces by flowing through narrow openings where other materials could get stuck or clog the line.

Macerators are also used in wastewater treatment, recycling plants and water treatment facilities. Here they help break down waste material so it can be processed. They are able to process waste that includes fat, grease, woody materials and fibrous substances like grass clippings.

Many wastewater treatment facilities also use macerators in their screening processes to screen out larger items before releasing water back into the system.

Macerators vs Pulverizers: What They Are

While they may sometimes be used interchangeably, macerators and pulverizers are actually two different pieces of equipment.

Macerators can process a range of materials and come equipped with rotating blades that tear apart the material, creating a pulp-like substance through sheer force and speed.

Pulverizers use crushing action to break down their materials into fine powders that can be used as a replacement to standard products like coal, diatomaceous earth, and clay. They work by grinding the materials until they resemble flour or sand in texture.

In many industries, macerators are used in places where drainage is an issue, such as sewers and toilets. The slurry that macerators create is able to clear these spaces by flowing through narrow openings where other materials could get stuck or clog the line.

Industries that use pulverizers include wastewater treatment, recycling plants, and water treatment facilities. Pulverizers are able to break down waste material so it can be processed. They are able to process waste that includes fat, grease, woody materials and fibrous substances like grass clippings.

Many wastewater treatment facilities also use macerators in their screening processes to screen out larger items before releasing water back into the system.

Macerator vs Pulverizer: What They Cost

The cost of services for both macerators and pulverizers depends on a number of factors, including local rates and the cost of operating the machinery.

Semi-industrial macerators typically start at around $500 (US) while pulverizers can start at around $2,000 (US). This is roughly the starting cost for these pieces of equipment; prices may go up depending on other factors.

Pulverizer vs Macerator: Advantages And Disadvantages

Macerators are more affordable than pulverizers, which can cost up to 50 times more. This makes macerators a great choice for smaller projects where drainage is an issue or in wastewater treatment facilities with lower budgets.

While both macerators and pulverizers are able to process most materials, macerators are better able to process materials that are fibrous in nature, including animal parts, rubber, textiles and plastics.

Macerators vs Pulverizers: Which To Choose

Consider the following factors when choosing between macerators and pulverizers:

  • Budget
  • Project size
  • What needs to be processed
  • Amount of material to be processed
  • Thickness or consistency of material, which determines how it will be handled

Macerators are able to process a range of materials and come equipped with rotating blades that tear apart the material, creating a pulp-like substance through sheer force and speed.

On the other hand, pulverizers use crushing action to break down their materials into fine powders. They work by grinding the materials until they resemble flour or sand in texture.

So, should you choose a pulverizer or a macerator? While both have their uses, it is important to consider the factors listed above when making your decision.

Generally speaking, macerators are better for smaller projects while pulverizers are often used in industrial applications.

The best use case scenario for macerators is the RV and boating toilet systems where water waste storage piping can easily get:

  1. Clogged with fat, grease, food waste etc.
  2. Be too small for standard sewage pumps or macerators
  3. Excess water flow is not an issue

The best use case scenario for a pulverizer is in wastewater treatment plants where they are used to process the following items:

  1. Wastewater sludge – Large deposits of fat, oil, and Grease (FOG) and other solids within the wastewater sludge pump into a vat where they are broken down by heat, chemicals, enzymes or bacteria. The resulting slurry is then pumped to various places in the plant for further processing
  2. Organics – Although macerators can process most organics found in sewage, there are some that are too stringy or fibrous to be fully processed. This is where a pulverizer comes in handy
  3. Other materials – Pulverizers can also process other types of materials, such as animal parts, rubber, textiles and plastics

Both macerators and pulverizers are used by recycling plants to reduce waste into smaller chunks that can then be processed and brought back to the market.

Pulverizers are the preferred choice because they create finer compost that can be sold at a higher price point.

Recent Posts